Global Hunger Academic Resources Discussion Guide

This Global Hunger Academic Resources Overview & Discussion Guide is intended to facilitate deeper engagement and reflection upon the 5 Academic and Deeper Learning Resources for the CRS Lead the Way on Hunger campaign.

[Note: Previous Faculty Learning Commons (FLC) modules and resources can be accessed as archives here through December 31, 2020. Please ensure you download or save any resources you anticipate using in the future, as they will no longer be accessible via the FLC archive past December 31, 2020.]

[Note: View Migration Academic Resources Overview & Discussion Guide.]

 

Resource 1: Hunger Issue Overview (Video: Good Nutrition: It’s about more than what you eat)

  1. Learning Goals
    • To examine the complex root causes and manifestations of global hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity and consider necessary policies, procedures and systems to address these challenges.
    • To understand how CRS responds around the world and what role(s) we can play in the US.
  2. Optional Additional Resources
  3. Pre-Reading Questions
    • What do you think it means to be "hungry"? To be "food insecure"?
    • What do you think are some of the contributing factors to food insecurity in the US and around the world?
    • What do you think are the daily nutrition requirements for a child to be able to develop to his/her full human capacity? For an adult?
    • Where does most of the food you eat each day come from? How much do you think about the actual nutritional content of what you eat each day or plan for a healthy diet?
    • Who grows your food? Who harvests it? How does it reach your table?
  4. Post-Reading Reflection Questions
    • What is something that surprised you in the video or readings?
    • Did you learn anything that challenged or corrected your own presuppostiions about food security and global hunger?
  5. Group Discussion Questions
    • Why is a multi-sectoral approach important to alleviating food insecurity and malnutrition?
    • Activity: Select one fresh item (not packaged food) that you ate for breakfast/lunch/dinner. Trace it... where did it come from (i.e. broccoli from Mexico or oranges from Florida). Now, see what you can find out about the situation of farmworkers in the place who harvest that crop.
    • What advocacy actions can you take, individually or communally, to respond? See the "Take Action Now" section of the Lead the Way on Hunger page or the "Advocacy Resources" on our Leadership & Action page. 

Resource 2: COVID-19 Connection (Story: COVID-19 and Hunger)

  1. Learning Goals
    • To explore COVID-19's impact on food access and nutrition around the world.
    • To understand how CRS responds around the world and what role(s) we can play in the US.
  2. Optional Additional Readings
  3. Pre-Reading Questions
    • Are there arny products that you or your family/friends were not able to buy as a result of COVID-19 shortages?
    • In what ways do you think food access and nutrition for the most marginalized in our local and global societies have been affected by COVID-19?
  4. Post-Reading Reflection Questions
    • A hallmark of Catholic social teaching is the preferential option for the poor. Those experincing poverty are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 on many levels. How does COVID-19 illuminate the need for a multi-sectoral approach to hunger and nutrition?
  5. Group Discussion Questions
    • Activity: Break into 3 groups. Each group select one of the 3 countries from the "COVID-19 and Hunger" story above. Investigate more about hunger and the COVID-19 situation in that country.
    • What advocacy actions can you take, individually or communally, to respond? See the "Take Action Now" section of the Lead the Way on Hunger page or the "Advocacy Resources" on our Leadership & Action page. 

Resource 3: Madagascar (Video: Spices: A Tale of Green Gold, Forests, Families, and Food)

  1. Learning Goals
    • To examine the complexities and intersections of hunger, nutrition and agriculture for families in Madagascar.
    • To understand how CRS responds and what role(s) we can play in the US.
  2. Optional Additional Readings
  3.  Pre-Reading Questions
    • When you think of Madagascar, what do you know about it and what images come to mind?
  4. Post-Reading Reflection Questions
    • Why did families who have been farming for generations need to learn new techniques?
    • Why did seasoned parents who already have several children need additional support for how to raise a healthier child?
    • How does the intersection of poverty, lack of opportunity and lack of agricultural education and resources contribute to climate change?
  5. Group Discussion Questions
    • How do beauty and nature on her farm and in her surroundings contribute to Felicite's human dignity and flourishing?
    • How are Felicite's life and your life interconnected?
    • How is the common good served by CRS's SPICE Project?
    • Should pre-natal care and well-child visits be considered a human right? What would the ramifications of such a commitment be? In what way would this be a pro-life commitment?
    • What advocacy actions can you take, individually or communally, to respond? See the "Take Action Now" section of the Lead the Way on Hunger page or the "Advocacy Resources" on our Leadership & Action page. 

Resource 4: Central America (Video: The Dry Corridor of Guatemala - Part I)

  1. Learning Goals
    • To learn about the root causes, including climate change, of food insecurity in Central America.
    • To understand how CRS responds and what role(s) we can play in the US.
  2. Optional Additional Resources
  3. Pre-Reading Questions
    • If your family only had accses, year round, to food that you produced for yourselves or that you could sell your crops in exchange for, would you be able to survive for five years?
    • How much rain does your region get? Have the patterns of rain changed over the last 20 years?
  4. Post-Reading Reflection Questions
    • Why are the farmers so sure that the climate is changing?
    • How are human dignity and the common good related to rural agriculture in Guatemala?
  5. Group Discussion Questions
    • How does the continual expansion of the "Dry Corridor" ultimately affect us all?
    • How might you be impacted by this without realizing it?
    • What is social capital? How can it be understood as a central element to stewardship and solidarity?
    • In what ways might your daily activities be exacerbating the growth of the "Dry Corridor"?
    • What advocacy actions can you take, individually or communally, to respond? See the "Take Action Now" section of the Lead the Way on Hunger page or the "Advocacy Resources" on our Leadership & Action page. 

Resource 5: Ethiopia (Video: We are Living Better: Safia’s Story)

  1. Learning Goals
    • To learn about the livelihoods of farmers in Ethiopia and some of the factors that affect those livelihoods.
    • To understand how CRS responds and what role(s) we can play in the US.
  2. Optional Additional Resources
  3. Pre-Reading Questions
    • Were any of your ancestors farmers? Do you know anyone who makes their living in a farming capacity?
    • How has the average annual rainfall in the area where you were born changed over the past twenty years?
    • How much could you grow on two hectares of land?
    • What connection, if any, do you have to the land where your daily food is grown?
  4. Post-Reading Reflection Questions
    • Safia says that when there is a good harvest, in those years they can live "very well." What do you think she means by "very well?" What is required for a person to live a life of dignity and flourishing?
    • The LRO described in the video strives to help people like Safia become "more food sufficient." What do you think it means to be "food sufficient?" How does that concept relate to your own personal access and consumption?
    • In the optional reading, how much of a loan does someone really need to make a difference in their capacity to support themselves? How long does it take them to repay that loan?
  5. Group Discussion Questions
    • The CRS representative describes Safia as a "change catalyst." What does that mean in her community? Who would be an example of a change catalyst in your communities? What would it take for you to become a change catalyst?
    • What does Safia want for her children and how is that similar or different from what you or your neighbors or family want for their children?
    • What does CRS provide to individuals and communities that makes a difference for them?
    • In the optional reading, what similarities and differences exist between the people in Dodota, Ethiopia and people in the US, in terms of access to capital?
    • What advocacy actions can you take, individually or communally, to respond? See the "Take Action Now" section of the Lead the Way on Hunger page or the "Advocacy Resources" on our Leadership & Action page. 

Action Opportunities

  1. What advocacy actions can you take, individually or communally, to respond? See the "Take Action Now" section of the Lead the Way on Hunger page or the "Advocacy Resources" on our Leadership & Action page. Some options include:
  2. How can you contribute to the funding that is needed for CRS to continue its work with people experiencing hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity?
  3. How can you vote your values?
    • Ensure you're a registered voter.
    • Research candidates and policies with an eye toward their impact on issues of global hunger and nutrition.
  4. How can you get involved locally?
    • Connect with your local Catholic Charities agencies to find out how they are working to support people experiencing hunger in your community.

 

CRS is deeply grateful to the following faculty for creation of and contribution to this resource:

  • Developed by:
    • Meghan J. Clark, Associate Professor of Moral Theology, Saint John's University (NY)
    • Elizabeth Collier, Professor of Business Ethics and Christopher Chair in Business Ethics, Dominican University (IL)
  • In collaboration with:
    • Theresa Ricke-Kiely, Executive Director for the Center for the Common Good, University of Saint Thomas (MN)
    • Robin G Vander, Associate Professor of English, African-American and Diaspora Studies, and Performance Studies, Xavier Unviersity of Louisiana (LA)
    • Jerry Zurek, Professor of English and Communication, Cabrini University (PA)

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